Stepney

From kareatstybbanhythe. The beautiful church at the end of the road.

The Lost City of London

Saxon rood (cross) Saxon rood (cross)

Stepney was first recorded in around 1000, as Stybbanhythe. It takes its name either from the Old English personal name “Stybba”, or the word “stybba”, meaning a wooden pile; and “hyth”, meaning landing place.  It became  built up, around the Saxon to Medieval church of St Dunstan and All Saints (otherwise known as both “The Mother Church of the East End” and “The Church of the High Seas”), in the post-Medieval period.  There were 6583 plague deaths in the parish, more than in any other in London,  in 1665.

Essentially Medieval exterior of church of St Dunstan and All Saints, with Red Ensign flying from tower
Essentially Medieval exterior of church of St Dunstan and All Saints, with Red Ensign flying from tower

Interior of church Interior of church

Memorial to Abraham Mallings, Mariner (d. 1644) Memorial to Abraham Mallings, Mariner (d. 1644)

Memorial to Admiral Sir John Berry (d. 1689) Memorial to Admiral Sir John Berry (d. 1689)

Memorial to Honist Abraham Zouch of Wappin[g], Ropemaker (d. 1648) Memorial to Honist Abraham Zouch of Wappin[g], Ropemaker (d. 1648)

Modern stained glass window and Saxon rood (cross) Modern stained glass window and Saxon rood (cross)

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